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Spike in Michigan COVID-19 cases prompts new message from health experts

State reported its highest single day increase on Saturday

DETROIT – Health officials are warning people about the threat of the coronavirus as fall continues and winter draws near.

Between the flu season and winter Michigan’s top doctor is bracing for a long fight against COVID-19.

“I think we have what it takes to bring it down. We had time to prepare for the next surge," said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, the chief medical executive of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Health officials are deeply concerned about the rising number of cases across the state. Experts agree being around a few people outside is far safer than socializing indoors. But as it gets colder people will be moving inside.

RELATED: Michigan health officials sound alarm on COVID-19 as cases surge

“If you’re in an enclosed space without much ventilation with lots of people the odds are more likely that one of those people are going to be spreading it," said Dr. Thomas Frieden, former CDC director.

Before deciding to attend a small gathering, you should be asking yourself a few questions.

He noted those questions include whether people are wearing masks, speaking loudly or shouting and what the ventilation is like.

On Saturday, the state reported 3,338 new cases and 35 additional deaths. It marked the state’s highest single day increase in COVID-19 cases.

The number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19) in Michigan has risen to 161,907 as of Monday, including 7,211 deaths, state officials report.

Monday’s update represents 3,881 new cases and 29 additional deaths over the past two days

Michigan’s 7-day moving average for daily cases was 1,876 on Sunday, the highest it has ever been. The state’s fatality rate is 4.6%. The state also reports “active cases,” which were listed at 35,900 as of Sunday. More than 114,000 have recovered in Michigan.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer made an appearance on Local 4 News Sunday and noted that the spike in cases could force the state to move backward in its plans to tackle COVID-19.


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