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What metrics are Michigan officials watching to decide if 3-week pause will be long enough?

MDHHS issues three-week pause with stricter statewide COVID-19 restrictions

Michigan COVID-19 data through Nov. 14, 2020
Michigan COVID-19 data through Nov. 14, 2020 (WDIV)

On Wednesday, Michigan will enter a three-week period of heightened COVID-19 restrictions, including no indoor dining at restaurants, remote learning for high school and college students and much more.

Click here to view the full details of the three-week pause.

But what will determine whether three weeks is long enough or if those restrictions need to be extended? Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was asked that question Sunday.

Here’s what Whitmer said:

"So, a couple of points first and foremost. What we’ve learned about COVID-19 is the incubation period is two to three weeks. We know that in other parts of the world -- in Europe and Israel -- they have had aggressive actions and seen the benefit of it in a matter of weeks.

“So our hope is that everyone takes this seriously and does their part, and we will see a dramatic improvement in our positivity rates and the sheer number of COVID-19 cases that we’re seeing. But it depends on every one of us doing our part, and I think that’s the important point here, is for this to work, if everyone does our part, we’re going to be in a much stronger position.

"It’s doing your part to protect yourself. We know masks protect the wearer, protect your family who you’re going home to every day, and you don’t want to bring something home. It is to protect the small business owner who is eager to keep their doors open after such a tough year. This is about our economy in a much larger sense, but it’s also about our individual health.

"Three weeks from now and every day in between the three weeks, we will be watching the numbers. We will be ensuring that our testing stays at the incredibly high level that it has been. We’ll be watching our percent positivity rates. We’ll be in constant communication with our local departments of public health, as well as the leaders of our hospital systems across the state.

“There are a lot of different factors, but these are the primary things that we’ll be looking at.”


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