How single people are coping with loneliness during the COVID pandemic

Some feel like they’re putting love on hold

Single people who live alone have few options to interact with people throughout the coronavirus pandemic -- but there are small things people can do to feel better.
Single people who live alone have few options to interact with people throughout the coronavirus pandemic -- but there are small things people can do to feel better.

DETROIT – Single people who live alone have few options to interact with people throughout the coronavirus pandemic -- but there are small things people can do to feel better.

The pandemic has changed day-to-day life for everyone. Those who have been single throughout isolation said they’re facing their own set of challenges.

READ: Detroit woman helps single people find matches amid isolating pandemic

Justin Main is a 31-year-old nurse practitioner who feels he’s putting his love life on hold through the pandemic.

“I already give so much of myself to my job but definitely in the last year with COVID I’ve been even more involved, and so that makes it even harder because it’s very hard to find someone that understands that,” Main said.

Alexa Randolph is a Metro Detroit podcaster. Randolph said she’s had dates, but nothing that’s lasted. Social distancing guidelines have led to many people having to live out their lives online.

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Dating apps have seen a boom in activity last year. Singles are turning to dating coaches and matchmakers to help them find a partner.

Lisa Chaben is a Metro Detroit matchmaker who runs a concierge dating service. She fixes up people on a personalized level. For the last six months, she’s been busier than ever.

“They just want a human connection. They don’t want to spend their time alone and being lonely is a huge thing that people are going through right now, because of the pandemic,” Chaben said.

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Susie Kamen is a Farmington Hills therapist who specializes in working with couples. She said it’s important to give yourself permission to acknowledge your feelings.

“I think teaching people to say, you know, ‘I am feeling really isolated right now. I’m feeling really lonely.’ That makes sense,” Kamen said.

She said decide what you want to do about your feelings and know your history. Experts said the emotional impact of the pandemic is encouraging people to take dating more seriously, because times of crisis, make many people realize how important it is to be surrounded by those you love.

READ: More coverage on dating


About the Authors:

Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.