GOP split over Trump, election runs across deep-red Wyoming

Full Screen
1 / 2

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2019 file photo, Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in Washington. A deepening divide among Republicans over President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the election runs prominently through Wyoming, the state that delivered Trump's widest prevailing margin by far. Eleven Republican senators saying they will not be voting Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory include Wyoming's newly sworn in Sen. Cynthia Lummis, a Cheyenne-area rancher and former congresswoman. Vocal opponents of any such move include Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, leader of GOP messaging in the House as its third-ranking Republican (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – A deepening divide among Republicans over President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the election runs prominently through Wyoming, the state that delivered Trump's widest prevailing margin by far.

Eleven Republican senators saying they will not be voting Wednesday to confirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory include Wyoming's newly sworn in Sen. Cynthia Lummis, a Cheyenne-area rancher and former congresswoman.

Vocal opponents of any such move include Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, leader of GOP messaging in the House as its third-ranking Republican.

Cheney's father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, joined the nine other living former U.S. defense secretaries in a Washington Post opinion piece Sunday saying the time for questioning the election was over.

The split in this reddest of states — while Trump continues to make baseless and unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud and voting irregularities — hints at possible trouble ahead for Republican unity once Biden is sworn in as president Jan. 20.

Trump will continue to hold sway over millions of people who voted for him. Through a new political action committee, he will be able to use much of the at least $170 million he has raised since the election to help or hinder the political fortunes of perceived allies or enemies for years to come.

In Wyoming, where Trump beat Biden by carrying a whopping 70% of votes cast, questions about political loyalty have riven Republican politics in recent years as it is. The Wyoming Republican Party has made party fealty a core issue and punished state party officials seen as disloyal.

“This is not about winning and losing. This is about being on the right side of history,” Wyoming GOP Chairman Frank Eathorne wrote in a letter urging Wyoming's all-Republican congressional delegation to reject the electoral votes of states including Georgia, Pennsylvania, Nevada, Arizona, Wisconsin and Michigan.