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Pavel Datsyuk’s agent says former Red Wings star is at family cottage -- the end.

Datsyuk's name gets thrown into bizarre Russian COVID-19 conspiracy theory

Pavel Datsyuk skates around in-between whistles during the game against the Buffalo Sabres on January 22, 2016 at the First Niagara Center in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images)
Pavel Datsyuk skates around in-between whistles during the game against the Buffalo Sabres on January 22, 2016 at the First Niagara Center in Buffalo, New York. (Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images)

DETROIT – Former Detroit Red Wings center Pavel Datsyuk is not “holed up at a Russian monastery where a priest has seized control and guarded the area with Cossacks after being told to stop services due to his Covid-19 conspiracy beliefs.”

He is at his cottage with his family, his agent Dan Milstein tweeted Thursday.

Milstein posted a video of Dastyuk chopping wood -- “Pavel Datsyuk’s morning workout and family breakfast at the cottage. Have a good summer everyone!”

All this time I just assumed he was spending the summer in the great Russian outdoors fishing, but chopping wood is cool, too. Rocky Balboa approves.

That chopping wood video was posted after Keith Gave, author of “The Russian Five,” had already taken to Twitter to try to set the record straight about what the Russian hockey player is up to -- “Just spoke with Pavel’s agent, who says Pavel is at his cottage with his family.”

What more is there to say now? Shall we speculate that Milstein is actually lying and covering for his KHL client who is actually, again, “holed up at a Russian monastery where a priest has seized control and guarded the area with Cossacks after being told to stop services due to his Covid-19 conspiracy beliefs.”

That’s what the Russian state-controlled TV network “RT” reported Wednesday with the tabloid-ready headline “Ex-NHL star Datsyuk ‘holed up at monastery defended by Cossacks with priest who claims Covid is cover-up to microchip population.’”

Ultimately, you decide what to believe -- a radical conspiracy theory about a professional athlete in Russia from Russian state news that has a history of airing conspiracy theories and publishing anti-American reports, or his agent’s statement. Up to you.

I still believe he’s spending most of his time trying to catch the big one.


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