Black Men In Leadership Summit looks to empower Black men in Detroit

‘We wanted to be able to create something that is going to not only enlighten our community about the roles that Black men really play in our country, in our homes, in our communities but also about why it’s important from a succession planning perspective to advance them in this country’

A special summit in Downtown Detroit aimed at tackling an important issue. The Black Men In Leadership Summit looks to encourage and lift up the next generation to careers in the boardroom. Some big names were on hand to do just that. We’ve heard much about diversity, equity, and inclusion in the past few years. The event took that to the next level by encouraging Black men to become successful leaders, board members, and CEOs. Thursday was an important day for the future of Black men in our country. Nearly 350 people made up the second annual Black Men In Leadership Summit.

DETROIT – A special summit in Downtown Detroit aimed at tackling an important issue.

The Black Men In Leadership Summit looks to encourage and lift up the next generation to careers in the boardroom.

Some big names were on hand to do just that.

We’ve heard much about diversity, equity, and inclusion in the past few years. The event took that to the next level by encouraging Black men to become successful leaders, board members, and CEOs.

Thursday was an important day for the future of Black men in our country.

Nearly 350 people made up the second annual Black Men In Leadership Summit.

“We wanted to be able to create something that is going to not only enlighten our community about the roles that Black men really play in our country, in our homes, in our communities but also about why it’s important from a succession planning perspective to advance them in this country,” said Darlene King of The Michigan Diversity Council.

The Michigan Diversity Council started the event to encourage the next generation of Black male leaders in the workforce while also changing the narrative of Black men in America.

“The narrative around Black men being fathers and being philanthropists and their give back to communities, we don’t hear that part as much as we should,” King said.

“We’ve got to keep the focus on the greatness of Black men and manifest our integrity, dignity, decency, and courage but especially our willingness to serve the least of these,” said Philosopher and Social Activist Dr. Cornel West.

West was the event’s keynote speaker, and Local 4 heard from a company president who admits his boardroom lacks diversity.

Evrod Cassimy: How does that make you feel?

Aston Carter President Stuart Ferguson: Frustrated (and) embarrassed.

“I think there’s a huge opportunity for us through ally-ship and through advocacy,” Ferguson said.

Ferguson said he’s here to change that now.

“One of them is to have diverse pipelines for our organization to continue to move people up to the highest levels of our organization,” Ferguson said.

The event will continue annually as they are encroaching the leaders of tomorrow, today.

You, too, can get involved in the Michigan Diversity Council by clicking here.


About the Authors:

Evrod Cassimy is the morning anchor for Local 4 News Today. He joined WDIV in August of 2013. He is an award winning journalist and a six-time Emmy Award nominee. Evrod was born in Michigan but grew up in the Chicagoland area.

Brandon Carr is a digital content producer for ClickOnDetroit and has been with WDIV Local 4 since November 2021. Brandon is the 2015 Solomon Kinloch Humanitarian award recipient for Community Service.