What the massive infrastructure deal could mean for Michigan roads

Whitmer also announced funding grants for smaller communities

The Senate approved a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan on Tuesday. The 69-30 tally provides momentum for this first phase of Biden’s “Build Back Better” priorities, now headed to the House.
The Senate approved a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan on Tuesday. The 69-30 tally provides momentum for this first phase of Biden’s “Build Back Better” priorities, now headed to the House.

The Senate approved a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan on Tuesday.

The 69-30 tally provides momentum for this first phase of Biden’s “Build Back Better” priorities, now headed to the House.

A sizable number of lawmakers showed they were willing to set aside partisan pressures, eager to send billions to their states for rebuilding roads, broadband internet, water pipes and the public works systems that underpin much of American life.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer plans to use some of that money to make good on her big campaign promise. She said it’ll be used to fix the roads. Whitmer also announced road funding grants geared towards repair in smaller Michigan communities.

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What could the $1T bipartisan infrastructure plan mean for Michigan?

The Senate approved a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure plan on Tuesday, a rare coalition of Democrats and Republicans joining to overcome skeptics and deliver a cornerstone of President Joe Biden’s agenda.

The 69-30 tally provides momentum for this first phase of Biden’s “Build Back Better” priorities, now headed to the House. A sizable number of lawmakers showed they were willing to set aside partisan pressures, eager to send billions to their states for rebuilding roads, broadband internet, water pipes and the public works systems that underpin much of American life.

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About the Author:

Hank Winchester is Local 4's Consumer Investigative Reporter and the head of WDIV's "Help Me Hank" Consumer Unit. He works to solve consumer complaints, reveal important recalls and track down thieves who have ripped off metro Detroiters.