Detroit mayor announces $15M plan to keep basements from flooding

Many homeowners experienced flooding last year

Last summer, heavy rain flooded thousands of basements in Detroit and the city was honest about what happened -- the pumps just couldn’t keep up. On Monday (Feb. 7), Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced a new effort to get into homes and install new equipment to keep basements dry.

DETROIT – Last summer, heavy rain flooded thousands of basements in Detroit and the city was honest about what happened -- the pumps just couldn’t keep up.

On Monday (Feb. 7), Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan announced a new effort to get into homes and install new equipment to keep basements dry.

The Jefferson Chalmers neighborhood was hit hard by flooding because of the proximity to the river. Under the new program, the area would be one of the first to get help to prevent flooding.

The Detroit Basement Flooding Initiative is a $15 million program that would look at 11 neighborhoods to target. A $2.4 million pilot program rolls out in the spring and the city is working to hire Detroit contractors to do the work.

Watch the video above for the full report.



Detroit launches program to reduce basement flooding in 11 neighborhoods: How to apply

The City of Detroit has launched a new program aimed at helping residents in flood prone neighborhoods protect their basement from damage.

Mayor Mike Duggan and Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) Director Gary Brown announced the Basement Backup Protection Program on Monday, an up to $15 million program to assist residential homeowners in protecting their property during rainstorms by installing a backwater valve and/or sump pump.

Click here to learn more.


About the Authors:

Hank Winchester is Local 4's Consumer Investigative Reporter and the head of WDIV's "Help Me Hank" Consumer Unit. He works to solve consumer complaints, reveal important recalls and track down thieves who have ripped off metro Detroiters.

Kayla is a Web Producer for ClickOnDetroit. Before she joined the team in 2018 she worked at WILX in Lansing as a digital producer.