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1 killed, multiple arrests made during protests in Downtown Detroit

‘This does not represent the vast majority of Detroiters,’ Police chief James Craig said

DETROIT – A 21-year-old man was killed and multiple arrests were made with police vehicles damaged during protests on Friday night in Downtown Detroit.

The protests, “March Against Police Brutality," began earlier in the day. It was held in the name of George Floyd, who was killed in a police altercation in Minneapolis earlier this week.

Derek Chauvin, 44, has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Floyd was handcuffed on the ground, pleading that he could not breathe as Chauvin pressed his knee into his neck. Floyd, who was black, had been arrested on suspicion of using a counterfeit bill at a store.

VIEW: Still images from protests in Downtown Detroit

READ: Officer charged with George Floyd’s death as protests flare

Protests have been occurring across the country. In Atlanta, a car was set on fire, and protesters also broke windows and spray painted messages on the CNN Center. In Minneapolis, an 8 p.m. curfew is in effect the entire weekend to try to keep the peace.

According to the Associated Press, the Pentagon is ordering the Army to put several active-duty U.S. military police units on the ready to deploy to Minneapolis.

In Phoenix, Denver, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and other cities, thousands of protesters carried signs that said: “He said I can’t breathe. Justice for George.” They chanted ”“No justice, no peace” and “Say his name. George Floyd.”

READ: Protests, some violent, spread in wake of George Floyd death

Local 4′s Jason Colthorp was live on scene

Local 4′s Jason Colthorp was in Downtown Detroit on Friday night to report on what were initially, peaceful protests.

He went live on Facebook as officers declared the protests an “illegal assembly” and continued to push the crowd back at Cadillac Square. Officers were in full riot gear as they pushed protesters back by several blocks.

Officers could be seen making multiple arrests throughout the night. Protesters were seen throwing items and taunting officers. Police pushed the crowd back toward Ford Street.

Randolph and Congress was full of people at one point during the protests. At one point, a vehicle on East Congress Street nearly struck two people, according to Colthorp.

Tear gas was used by officers throughout the night.

The videos below were live and may contain language some might find offensive.

21-year-old man shot, killed

Police said a 21-year-old man from Eastpointe was shot around 11:30 p.m. in the area of Congress and Randolph streets. The suspect approached the victim, who was sitting in his vehicle with two other occupants, and fired shots into the vehicle. The three occupants exited the vehicle, but the victim was shot at some point and later died.

The unknown shooter fled the scene on foot in an unknown direction.

MORE: Updated Report: Eastpointe man shot, killed during George Floyd protests in Detroit

Detroit police clash with protesters on May 29, 2020.
Detroit police clash with protesters on May 29, 2020. (WDIV)

Detroit Police Chief James Craig speaks about protests

Detroit police Chief James Craig spoke to Local 4 about the protests on Friday night, just before 10:30 p.m.

“We have roughly 1,500 peaceful protesters with a message,” Craig said. “I will not stand by and let a small minority of criminals come in here, attack our officers, and make our community unsafe -- just know, we’re not going to tolerate it.”

Craig said one person who had been arrested at that point was involved in a pursuit on a freeway and that person is accused of trying to run over a police officer.

Several police cars had been damaged at that point, and a command officer had been transported to a local hospital for injuries, according to Craig.

“To the young man who thought he could get away with ripping the windshield out of one of our police cars, we do know who you are,” Craig said. “He’s still out there, but we know who he is and we know he lives outside the city.”

“This does not represent the vast majority of Detroiters who came here to make a statement,” Craig said.


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