Nashville police provide update on downtown Christmas bombing investigation

Girlfriend of bombing suspect warned he was building bombs in 2019

A vehicle destroyed in a Christmas Day explosion remains on the street Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. Officials have named 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner as the man behind the bombing in which he was killed, but the motive has remained elusive. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
A vehicle destroyed in a Christmas Day explosion remains on the street Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. Officials have named 63-year-old Anthony Quinn Warner as the man behind the bombing in which he was killed, but the motive has remained elusive. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

NASHVILLE – Police shared the latest details of an investigation into downtown Nashville’s Christmas day bombing during a news conference Wednesday, Dec. 30.

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Earlier this week, police identified Anthony Quinn Warner as the man responsible for the downtown Nashville bombing.

The Nashville police chief said Wednesday that officers investigated claims made by Warner’s girlfriend in 2019 that he was building bombs, but to no avail.

Read: Nashville man’s girlfriend warned he was building bombs


US officials: Suspect in Nashville explosion died in blast (AP)

The man believed to be responsible for the Christmas Day bombing that tore through downtown Nashville blew himself up in the explosion, and appears to have acted alone, federal officials said Sunday.

Investigators used DNA and other evidence to link the man, identified as Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, to the mysterious explosion but said they have not determined a motive. Officials have received hundreds of tips and leads, but have concluded that no one other than Warner is believed to have been involved in the early morning explosion that damaged dozens of buildings and injured three people.

In publicly identifying the suspect and his fate, officials disclosed a major breakthrough in their investigation even as they acknowledged the lingering mystery behind the explosion, which took place on a holiday morning well before downtown streets were bustling with activity and was accompanied by a recorded announcement warning anyone nearby that a bomb would soon detonate.

Then, for reasons that may never be known, the audio switched to a recording of Petula Clark’s 1964 hit “Downtown” shortly before the blast.

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