ClickOnDetroit Morning Briefing -- June 16, 2020

Here are this morning’s top stories

Detroit statues and monuments. (Left to right) Monument for Russell A. Alger; Statue of General Alexander Macomb; Statue of Father Gabriel Richard.
Detroit statues and monuments. (Left to right) Monument for Russell A. Alger; Statue of General Alexander Macomb; Statue of Father Gabriel Richard. (WDIV)

A look at history behind Detroit statues, monuments

The world is taking another look at who is being honored with statues in their communities -- and the history behind those decisions.

Statues and monuments have long been a controversial topic in the U.S., especially Confederate monuments in the South. In recent weeks, protests against racism have resulted in the toppling or removal of several monuments around the world.

In Bristol, England, demonstrators toppled a statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston and threw it in the harbor. City authorities said it will be put in a museum.

The New Zealand city of Hamilton removed a bronze statue of the British naval officer for whom it is named — a man who is accused of killing indigenous Maori people in the 1860s.

In Detroit, Mayor Mike Duggan ordered the city’s Christopher Columbus bust to be removed. It was installed more than 100 years ago.

In the U.S., the May 25 death of George Floyd, a Black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee to his neck, has led to an all-out effort to remove symbols of the Confederacy and slavery. Several statues of Confederate army leaders have been removed or vandalized, including that of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Gen. Robert E. Lee. Around the world, historical figures are being re-examined.

Given all of the attention around statues, let’s take a look at statues around Detroit -- and the stories behind the people and faces we etch into history.

Coronavirus in Michigan: Here’s what to know

The number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19) in Michigan has risen to 60,064 as of Monday, including 5,772 deaths, state officials report.

Monday’s total represents an increase of 74 cases and two additional deaths. Sunday’s total was 59,990 confirmed cases and 5,770 deaths.

New cases and deaths continue to slow in Michigan, along with hospitalizations. Testing continues to ramp up, with an average of more than 15,000 per day in the last two weeks.

Michigan has reported 44,964 COVID-19 recoveries. The state also reports “active cases,” which were listed at 9,300 as of Sunday.

Here’s a look at the data in Michigan:


Weather: Terrific Tuesday with temps in the 80s

Metro Detroit weather forecast for June 16, 2020 -- morning update
Metro Detroit weather forecast for June 16, 2020 -- morning update

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